Asia

Lagori (India)

Name of sport (game): Lagori
Place of practice (continent, state, nation):

India

Description:

Lagori, dikori or lagoori, also known as Lingocha, Pithu (Punjabi), Palli Patti (Karimnagar), Pitto (Rajasthan), Pittu (Bengal) or Satoliya(Madhya Pradesh).

Lagori is a team sport that originated in Southern part of India. The sport is played only at a recreational level, a popular playground game. The sport goes buy many names, including Pittu Garam (meaning 7 stones).
Lagori is played between two teams, with a minimum of 3 players and a maximum of nine on each team, using seven stones and a rubber ball. Each team gets nine chances, 3 players taking 3 chances each, to knock down the stones that are stacked vertically, from a distance of about 20ft. If one team is unable to knock down the stones the next team gets the chance to throw.
If the throwing team knocks down the stones, the objective of the team is to stack all the seven stones back. The objective of the defensive team is to strike any player of the throwing team with the ball, below knee level. Players on the defensive team are not allowed to run with the ball and have to pass between players to move the ball.
If the offensive team successfully stacks the stones first, the team receives a point, and gets to throw the ball again. If the defensive team is able to strike a player first below the knee, there is a change in possession.
There are no fixed rules for number of players or match durations. Matches are usually played for a fixed number of points, about 7 to 10.

Current status:

Practiced

Sources of information :

Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l7u5fGu9TFg&fbclid=IwAR06qb5rXVIwKcva5wtN4plD1QI4ox_hEqjFijrXsMDm3vIB1P-ErYbrg-0

Makepung (Indonesia, Bali)

Name of sport (game): Makepung
Name in native language: Makepung
Place of practice (continent, state, nation):

The Makepung races are held every two weeks throughout the dry season, always on Sunday. There are seven different circuits that are used for the races and they’re all located in Jembrana, West Bali.

History:

Before the race became popular in the 1930s, it took place on wet fields to facilitate the working of agricultural land. Now it takes place on dry land.
Makepung is the name of a major grand prix in Jembrana, West Bali, which features racing buffalo races. Hundreds of pairs of buffaloes are teamed up together with their jockeys. They ride the traditional wooden ploughs that are slightly modified for the competition. The racer buffaloes, or kerbau pepadu, compete in various open race circuits in assorted heats. These series of competitions are held around the district of Melaya. They lead up to the finals, known as the Jembrana Regent’s Cup and the Governor’s Cup.
West Bali’s Jembrana region entertains its residents and visitors in the know with its Makepung, a water buffalo race introduced about a century ago by migrants from neighbouring Madura. Wearing colourful banners and crowns, their horns decorated and wooden bells tied around their neck, the bulls race down an erratic track. It’s remarkable to see such docile creatures thunder across the finish line at a speed. The daredevil charioteers often ride standing up on their chariots, twisting the bulls’ tails to give them extra motivation. Farmers and their buffalos come to race for honour, pride and the trophy, rather than for money.
Often spotted during Makepung (especially during the big competitions), is the region’s unique Gamelan Jegog, a musical ensemble using only bamboo instruments, some of which are gigantic 3-metre long tubes. Jegog music is very fast, rhythmic, and precise. The instruments are played in specific sequences and produce some wonderful sounds, while also being visually attractive. Some have likened the resonant sounds to roaring thunder as the music can be heard from quite a distance away. Gamelan Jegog accompanies traditional dances such as the Tari Silat (self-defence dance) and newer ones such as Tari Makepung (bull race dance).

Description:

Before the race, the buffalo’s horns are painted and they are adorned with colorful ribbons and harnesses. A pair of two water buffaloes is paired with a jockey and hooked up to a traditional wooden plough. Teams are divided into east and west, which you can recognize by their uniforms. Teams from the east wear red while those from the west wear green.
The race track is made up of 125 m of wet rice field with four pairs of buffalo compete in one round. It becomes more fun when the jockey falls and wallows on the muddy land during the traditional race.

Current status:

Practiced

Sources of information :

Film - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkVQx5vPKAA
Film - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xe8vFbGYl9g
Film - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXQDLXvDbQ4

Gallery:

Makha or mokha (Pakistan)

Name of sport (game): Makha or Mokha
Name in native language: Makha or Mokha
Place of practice (continent, state, nation):

Traditional Pashtun archery. Sport is practiced mainly in the Yousafzai tribe - Buner, Swabi and Mardan regions and in some parts of Haripur in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

Description:

Makha's equipment consists of a long arrow (gashash in pashto) and a long bow (leenda). The tip of the arrow is not sharp, but has a flat, round piece of metal attached (tubray).
Once, the bow was a weapon of war. However, after the invention of modern weapons, Makha became a sport, played mainly in the Yousafzai tribe. People who emigrated from their regions to Karachi in the 1960s continued to practice this sport by regularly organizing tournaments.
The rules of the game are simple: archers play in teams of 12-10 players (and two in reserve), trying to hit a small white wooden target, called takai in pashto, located 32 feet from the archer. A round ring secured with fresh clay surrounds the target. Each team proposes a senior member of the community as a referee. The referee changes each round.
Each player has his arrow and bow. They shoot twice in each round, and the team with the most accurate shots advance to the next round of the tournament.
Competitors usually buy arrows and bows from the Jandol area of Dir, where the horns of Markhor, a wild goat from mountain forests, are used. Some also buy arrows and bows at Marghoz in Swabi.

Current status:

Over time and the popularity of other sports, this centuries-old traditional Pashtun sport disappears. But the Yousafzai tribes try to keep him alive, want to revive and promote Makha by organizing regular tournaments.
During the tournament, the organizers also invite dhol musicians who, after a shot in the target, beat their instrument rhythmically and are properly supported by the sounds of bajajy (horns) and dance lovers. Also in some tournaments, such as Karachi, Pashto poets recite their poetry. Makha tournaments are usually organized in spring or after wheat harvest, when people have relatively more time.

Gallery:

Mallakhamb(a) or Malkhamb or Malkhumb (India)

Place of practice (continent, state, nation):

India

Description:

Basic information on sports and equipment used in mallakhamb exercises is presented in the following video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kai6p1xss7Y&feature=share&fbclid=IwAR3qLUrAwTa9DyBR7lJHpelLQ1lXWk-VOLExYAoa9vEDx_8UgYUnFW3Ccy4

Sources of information :

Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sAMjPXlCwc&feature=share&fbclid=IwAR13QQXwRLUQ3TQ2bbcwJjGMI2l2g_FEedDnd_xwozr5QS7AHA3teUJxav0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kai6p1xss7Y&feature=share&fbclid=IwAR3qLUrAwTa9DyBR7lJHpelLQ1lXWk-VOLExYAoa9vEDx_8UgYUnFW3Ccy4

Gallery:

Documents:

pdfRules_-_international_mallakhamb_fedaretion.pdf

pdfRules_Mallakhamb.pdf

Kyudo (Japan)

Name of sport (game): Kyudo
Gallery:

Lethwei (Burma)

Name of sport (game): Lethwei
Name in native language: Burmese: လက်ဝှေ့
Place of practice (continent, state, nation):

Myanmar

Sources of information :

Books:
Zoran Rebac, Traditional Burmese boxing, Ed. Paladin Press, Boulder, 2003

Articles:
https://www.thefight-site.com/home/introduction-to-lethwei-1

Mallyuddha or Malla-yuddha (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka)

Name of sport (game): Mallyuddha or Malla-yuddha
Name in native language: Devanagari: मल्लयुद्ध, Bengali: মল্লযুদ্ধ, Odia: ମଲ୍ଲ ଯୁଦ୍ଧ, Kannada: ಮಲ್ಲಯುದ್ಧ, Telugu: మల్ల యుద్ధం malla-yuddhaṁ, Tamil: மல்யுத்தம் malyutham, Thai: มัลละยุทธ์ mạllayutṭh̒
Place of practice (continent, state, nation):

Mallyuddha is the traditional South Asian form of combat-wrestling created in what is now India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka. 

History:

It is closely related to Southeast Asian wrestling styles such as naban and is the ancestor of kusti.

Description:

Malla-yuddha incorporates grappling, joint-breaking, punching, biting, choking and pressure point striking. Matches were traditionally codified into four types which progressed from purely sportive contests of strength to actual full-contact fights known as yuddha. Due to the extreme violence, this final form is generally no longer practised. The second form, wherein the wrestlers attempt to lift each other off the ground for three seconds, still exists in south India. Additionally, malla-yuddha is divided into four styles, each named after Hindu gods and legendary fighters:
• Hanumanti concentrates on technical superiority,
• Jambuvanti uses locks and holds to force the opponent into submission,
• Jarasandhi concentrates on breaking the limbs and joints while
• Bhimaseni focuses on sheer strength.

Current status:

Practiced

Contacts:

IFM - International Federation of Mallyuddha
C/o National Martial Arts Academy India
Pari Chowk, Pari Chowk, Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Webside: https://mallyuddha.com/

logo Federation mallyuddha

Mardani khel (India)

Name of sport (game): Mardani khel
Place of practice (continent, state, nation):

Maharashtra, India

Contact

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Fundacja IRSiE

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Warsaw, 00-116

traditionalsports@sportinstytut.pl

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